Digital Design Portfolio
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Eone Time Pop-up Shop

Eone Time Pop-up Shop

Pop-up shop design for online watch store Eone Time 

Design Challenge

The goal of this project is to design a retail environment for the online watch store Eone Time.

Context

  • Client: Eone Time
  • Class: Environments Studio III: Designing for Complex Systems

Process

  1. Understanding the Client
  2. Ideation
  3. Physical Prototyping
  4. Concept Maturity
  5. Final Deliverables

Pop-Up Proposal

Eone Time is a watch company that creates watches which use a tactile interaction. Engineered by MIT Media Lab, the Bradley watch created waves in the blind and horological community for their innovative take on time. This watch is beautifully designed and unobtrusive compared to many other watches designed for the blind. 

My design is intended to be placed at Market Square and act as a temporary pop-up shop to increase exposure to the brand. The Eone installation is to act as a place of leisure for park-goers who can be exposed to the technology, materiality and tactility of the brand, along with the physical product selection of the watches behind the kiosk.

 


1. Understanding the Client

Introduction

Eone Time is a watch company that creates watches which use a tactile interaction. The engineering came out of MIT media lab, and created waves in the blind community as well as horological community for their innovative take on time. This watch is beautifully designed and unobtrusive compared to many other watches design for the blind. Additionally, Eone uses an interesting take on measuring time — instead of segmenting it into sections, a smooth ball-bearing movement suggests a cyclical concept of measurement. Their watch has all of the precision without a need to count minutes to understand time, encouraging the user to have a more passive take with their day. Both these things make them highly covetable as well as luxurious, with a price of around $200-$300 per watch.

One important thing to note is that the brand emphasizes its design philosophy, “Designed for everyone.” The brand has conducted extensive user testing with a diverse disabled audience, not only those who are blind.

 

Product Ecosystem

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Considerations

A key consideration to keep in mind while designing is that their online website acts as a great platform, along with a series of worldwide boutique shops and museums that stock their item. For the purposes of my pop-up shop, I have decided to focus on exposing the brand image to a wider audience, instead of selling the product.

After doing some client research, my partner and I decided that three key takeaways are:

  1.  Eone provides a discreet, intuitive and durable sensory experience.
  2. Eone speaks with a stylish, innovative and modernist aesthetic.
  3. The use of the product supports accessibility and inclusivity.

2. Ideation

Setting the Tone

I looked at things that gave me a similar mood as the Eone Time brand. Some particularly interesting connections were Monk House Design’s display platforms. It uses neutral colors to capture attention with minimalist form. Also, the Warby Parker displays were interesting to look at because of the similar product size and accessibility levels the products had.

The lighting techniques were also of interest, as they created a unique and ambient mood. They showcase beautiful design with low lighting, appropriate for a luxury product like Eone.

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Conception

Building off these displays, I developed an initial design of a housing fixture for the product to be displayed in. It consisted of a dome-like shape, with a skylight that would change the projection of light based on the location of the sun. The building itself would be made out of an origami folding technique to capture the attractive tactility that the watch uses. I wanted the structure to be something people wanted to touch. The displays themselves would be on colored blocks, with a triangular kiosk. The block colors would match with the materiality of the watch it was displaying.

However, I quickly realized that such a display, with a watch-face floor layout, would look almost religious. The products on display would not look like things that people would want to interact with. It also might act as an isolating experience, and would interfere with the purpose of creating exposure to new audiences.

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My second design was developed based on a lighting installation in front of the MoMa. In order to make the space inviting, I decided to create an open space for leisure instead of one that is closed off. People would be able to enjoy their day while being exposed to the product, while using the watch face as a layout.

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3. Physical Prototyping

Low Fidelity Model

After I got my idea down, I started building out the floor plan and site plan for where everything was going to take place.

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Textile Exploration

After I did some initial prototyping I realized I was missing a kiosk. Even though I had a place where people could enjoy their time, I did not have enough branding and a place where people could make direct contact with the product. I also wanted to develop a canopy to protect from the weather, since this installation would happen in an open space.

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I tried to bring back the origami element of my prototype for a canopy. I used some designs from online and created different patterns on illustrator. Then I used a plotter and scored the lines on polypropylene sheets. The idea was to create a canopy that had flexible sizing with the installation itself.

I quickly found that the canopy would be difficult to develop in that direction given my timeframe. It would have taken more time than I had to engineer my design in that direction.

 
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4. Concept Maturity

Pivot

I redesigned my canopy under a different goal. I had a problem with communicating the branding directly to the audience. Instead of incorporating the origami materiality of my initial design, I decided to focus on the time/sun experience aspect.

The canopy instead is made of a clear plastic, with a opaque plastic that embeds Eone’s logo into the top. It projects a shadow on the space below, and it’s position changes with the position of the light overhead. Additionally, I brought in the form for my original kiosk so an employee could stand behind it for people to try on the watches.

I made some designs on illustrator and laser-cut them into acrylic for my final model.

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5. Final Deliverables

Introduction

My design is intended to be placed at Market Square and act as a temporary pop-up shop to increase exposure to the brand. The Eone installation is to act as a place of leisure for park-goers who can be exposed to the technology, materiality and tactility of the brand, along with the physical product selection of the watches behind the kiosk.

On-site Renderings

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The Eone seating would be made of plastic coated with the material of the watches: colored titaniums, “rose-gold” (or in this case, copper), gold, and silver.

 

Model Photos

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The seats themselves would have text engraved on one side in Georgia type, and the other in American Standard Braille with standard type size. This way, the space would be communicable to blind audiences. Once a person sits down, they can feel the text along the edges.

 

Floor Plan

 Final elevation drawings.

Final elevation drawings.